People , People Everywhere. . . . . . Urban India

 INDIA_CHANGE12-01-2

 These high-end apartments on the outskirts of Delhi in a area called Gurgon spring up like mushrooms. Our second  trip when we drove into Delhi, it seemed the number had multiplied.  The weather is  mostly  fine for construction in India, except maybe during monsoon.  The demand for these homes remains high.  The young Indian architects dreamed of living in an apartment such as this.  The Americans were fascinated by  the old city homes such as the Pols in Ahmedabad.   Culture difference and experiential , as well, I am sure.

List of million-plus urban agglomerations in India

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

India is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by geographical area, the second-most populous country with over 1.2 billion people. India consists of twenty-nine states and seven union territories.[1] It is a home to 17.5 percent of the world’s population.[2]

Urban areas

The first population census in British India was conducted in 1872. Since 1951, a census has been carried out every 10 years.[3] The census in India is carried out by the Office of the Registrar General and Census Commissioner under the Ministry of Home Affairs, and is one of the largest administrative tasks conducted by a federal government.[4]

The latest population figures are based on data from the 2011 census of India.[5] India has 641,000 inhabited villages and 72.2 percent of the total population reside in these rural areas.[5] Of them 145,000 villages have population size of 500–999 persons; 130,000 villages have population size of 1000–1999 and 128,000 villages have population size of 200–499. There are 3,961 villages that have a population of 10,000 persons or more.[2] India’s 27.8 percent urban population lives in more than 5,100 towns and over 380 urban agglomerations.[6] In the decade of 1991–2001, migration to major cities caused rapid increase in urban population.[7][8] The number of Indians living in urban areas has grown by 31.2% between 1991 and 2001.[9] Yet, in 2001, over 70% lived in rural areas.[10][11] According to the 2001 census, there were 27 million-plus cities in India,[9] with Mumbai, Delhi, Kolkata, and Chennai being the largest.

There are 53 urban agglomerations in India with a population of 1 million or more as of 2011 against 35 in 2001.[12] About 43 percent of the urban population of India lives in these cities.[13] Among these cities Srinagar, has become the first agglomeration in Jammu and Kashmir to cross one million. Kerala has added six new million-plus agglomerations in addition to Kochi, the only such area in 2001, and Jharkhand has three such areas.[12]

Gallery

List

Rank UA[a] State/Territory Population (2011)[15] Population (2001)[14]
1 Mumbai Maharashtra 18,394,912 16,434,386
2 Delhi Delhi 16,349,831 13,850,507
3 Kolkata West Bengal 14,057,991 13,205,697
4 Chennai Tamil Nadu 8,653,521 6,560,242
5 Bangalore Karnataka 8,520,435 5,701,446
6 Hyderabad Telangana 7,677,018 5,742,036
7 Ahmedabad Gujarat 6,357,693 4,525,013
8 Pune Maharashtra 5,057,709 3,760,636
9 Surat Gujarat 4,591,246 2,811,614
10 Jaipur Rajasthan 3,046,163 2,322,575
11 Kanpur Uttar Pradesh 2,920,496 2,715,555
12 Lucknow Uttar Pradesh 2,902,920 2,245,509
13 Nagpur Maharashtra 2,497,870 2,129,500
14 Ghaziabad Uttar Pradesh 2,375,820 968,256
15 Indore Madhya Pradesh 2,170,295 1,506,062
16 Coimbatore Tamil Nadu 2,136,916 1,461,139
17 Kochi Kerala 2,119,724 1,355,972
18 Patna Bihar 2,049,156 1,697,976
19 Kozhikode Kerala 2,028,399 880,247
20 Bhopal Madhya Pradesh 1,886,100 1,458,416
21 Thrissur Kerala 1,861,269 330,122
22 Vadodara Gujarat 1,822,221 1,491,045
23 Agra Uttar Pradesh 1,760,285 1,331,339
24 Visakhapatnam Andhra Pradesh 1,728,128 1,345,938
25 Malappuram Kerala 1,699,060 170,409
26 Thiruvananthapuram Kerala 1,679,754 889,635
27 Kannur Kerala 1,640,986 498,207
28 Ludhiana Punjab 1,618,879 1,398,467
29 Nashik Maharashtra 1,561,809 1,152,326
30 Vijayawada Andhra Pradesh 1,476,931 1,039,518
31 Madurai Tamil Nadu 1,465,625 1,203,095
32 Varanasi Uttar Pradesh 1,432,280 1,203,961
33 Meerut Uttar Pradesh 1,420,902 1,161,716
34 Faridabad Haryana 1,414,050 1,055,938
35 Rajkot Gujarat 1,390,640 1,003,015
36 Jamshedpur Jharkhand 1,339,438 1,104,713
37 Jabalpur Madhya Pradesh 1,268,848 1,098,000
38 Srinagar Jammu and Kashmir 1,264,202 988,210
39 Asansol West Bengal 1,243,414 1,067,369
40 Vasai-Virar Maharashtra 1,222,390
41 Allahabad Uttar Pradesh 1,212,395 1,042,229
42 Dhanbad Jharkhand 1,196,214 1,065,327
43 Aurangabad Maharashtra 1,193,167 892,483
44 Amritsar Punjab 1,183,549 1,003,917
45 Jodhpur Rajasthan 1,138,300 860,818
46 Raipur Chhattisgarh 1,123,558 700,113
47 Ranchi Jharkhand 1,120,374 863,495
48 Gwalior Madhya Pradesh 1,117,740 865,548
49 Kollam Kerala 1,110,668 380,091
50 Durg-Bhilainagar Chhattisgarh 1,064,222 927,864
51 Chandigarh Chandigarh 1,026,459 808,515
52 Tiruchirappalli Tamil Nadu 1,022,518 866,354
53 Kota Rajasthan 1,001,694 703,150

 Fifty-three cities of a million or more  souls! 

About annetbell

I am a retired elementary teacher, well seasoned world traveler,new blogger, grandmother, and a new enthusiastic discoverer of the wonderfully complex country of India. Anne
This entry was posted in Amdavad, Animals, Delhi, India, Travel, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to People , People Everywhere. . . . . . Urban India

  1. Interesting.
    Those are some massive cities, only China can rival them for populace. It’ll be interesting to see how India grows in the coming years.

    • annetbell says:

      Thanks for stopping by and commenting. India will surpass China in the near future because of China’s one child policy. But BTW, China is allowing or overlooking a second child now.

  2. Pingback: Vadodara 8th Cleanest City in India

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