Beware the Ides of March !

It was the year 44 BC and Julius Caesar was at the top of his game, or so he thought. A respected seer had predicted his assassination on the Ides of March (March 15).  As he walked to the Theater of Pompey for a meeting of the Senate, he saw the seer in the crowd.  He said in a cocky way, “See, everything is fine with me!”  She warned, “The day is not yet over!”  At the theater, all 60 senators led by Cassius and Brutus were waiting to  stab Cesar  with the knives hidden in their togas. On that day Julius Cesar breathed his last breath being stabbed by men he counted as friends.

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Statue  just outside the Forum which can be seen in the background.

Here is the statute to Julius Cesar standing just outside his Forum. And each year, flowers are laid at his feet, on the ground around him, or on his grave in the Forum to commemorate the turning point in Roman history when the Roman Republic became the Roman Empire at the death of Cesar. Ironically, the senators killed him because they feared he was going to declare himself king.  And his adopted son, Augustus later did that very thing.

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Flowers on the grave inside the Forum.

I have visions of people my age, who were required to study Latin for preparation for college, placing flowers to  honor  the great general.  All I can remember in way of tribute  is one grand statement Cesar made after a successful battle:

“Veni, Vidi, Vici!”   I came, I saw, I conquered!

This Is the Ides of March in Roma !

Wikipedia for text and images

About annetbell

I am a retired elementary teacher, well seasoned world traveler,new blogger, grandmother, and a new enthusiastic discoverer of the wonderfully complex country of India. Anne
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14 Responses to Beware the Ides of March !

  1. YellowCable says:

    A good bit of history.. The music is a bit sad but I think it is suitable for the man!

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  2. Dr. Rex says:

    Reblogged this on It Is What It Is and commented:
    Ides of March!!!

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  3. kyangel17 says:

    I took 3 years of Latin and can remember one other opening phrase, “Galla diviso est in tres partes”. Julius Ceasar, third year Latin. I really wanted to take French, but when you think of it, Latin and Greek are the root languages of all the languages in most of the world. Not sure I would have been able to learn Greek, but did okay in Latin, thanks to being Catholic and growing up with the Latin Mass.

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    • annetbell says:

      Wow, I am impressed. In my high school, kids in the college track took two or more years of Latin and then 2 years of French or German. The non-college students took Spanish …it was easier and was only a peasant language…..now half the world speaks Spanish and French is no longer the universal language!

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  4. I love the music.
    And history in bite sized chunks.
    I remember, ‘Puella in horto est’ and how to decline a number of verbs but there’s not much call now for knowing where the girl is. 😉
    Still, it helps with other languages. And is handy for knowing the root of words. 🙂 x

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  5. More learning!! Thank you so much xx

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  6. reocochran says:

    Very nice explanation of the history behind the Ides of March. I love the real photos and the way you wrote this! The Greek message can be for any day, we can all ‘conquer’ in our lives, right? Smiles, Robin

    Like

  7. suzjones says:

    Funnily enough, Ide is a family name in my family and I have cousins born in March. 🙂

    Like

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