Eklingji or Meera Hindu Temple in Rajasthan

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One of our first site visits on the north trip to Rajasthan , was to several Hindu temples.  This one called Eklingji or Meera is a complex of actually 108 individual temples. Many are only single rooms for prayer. This complex of all the northern temples remained vividly in my memrory. I am not sure why, but I think it could be the setting which was in a small village with the temple  seemingly squeezed between buildings at the entrance and then  opening into space behind to provided for the sanctuary. The opening was elaborately carved stone around  a small entrance door.  We arrived just at dusk fell  as the 35 miles from Udiapur took longer than expected due to heavy traffic , buses and cars, as well as camels, winding roads and the never ending bikes. The approaching darkness added to the mystery.

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Entering through the small door, we were in the foyer where we left our shoes which was mandatory in each consecrated temple we visited. Some would allow socks, but others insisted on bare feet.  We were asked by flower vendors and fruit and rice sellers to buy offerings.  Also there was an older man near the door who wanted to bless us with the orange powder spot placed with his finger on our forehead. . . . .for a small tip. Our guide told us we were not to smell the flowers because the sweet scent was for lord Shiva only.  Women were expected to cover our heads which wasn’t a problem as we had all follow in love with the lovely Indian scarves and always wore them.

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Next we entered a long corridor constructed by huge stone blocks on the floor and the walls that seem to rise up, up , up on either side. It made me think of the pictures I have seen of the windy, narrow, ancient streets of Jerusalem.

Entering the sanctuary, our senses were assaulted by the flickering candles, the only light source, the continuous, high-pitched  chanting, and the colorful saris worn by the faithful women. Then I was hit with the realization of being in the center of ancient worship of an ancient religion in the year 2013! I think little has changed in this temple first built in the 8th century. . . . . .1300 years ago! The priests took the plates of food and the flower garlands and placed them before lord Shiva.  He was represented with four heads and made from black marble. eklingji2

The bell was ringing over and over and the sound reverberated as it bounced off and on the stone surfaces so  we left.  By now the moon had risen high in the sky and with the absence of electricity , we saw little to none of the other temples. The architecture, the carved stone, the ancient ceremony, the colorful flowers, the chanting, flickering candles, we soon became accustomed to on visits to other temples. But Eklingji was memorable and mysterious as one of our first!

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Namaste. . .  . . . . .This Is Incredible India!

Pictures are from Google Images, Public Domain

About annetbell

I am a retired elementary teacher, well seasoned world traveler,new blogger, grandmother, and a new enthusiastic discoverer of the wonderfully complex country of India. Anne
This entry was posted in Architecture, India, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

42 Responses to Eklingji or Meera Hindu Temple in Rajasthan

  1. sknicholls says:

    Hindi, being the oldest religion in the world, shows a civilization that is far more culturally advanced than our own. We like to think that we are and advanced society and when I see things like these ornate temples, I can only laugh at how small we are and how little we have really developed.

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    • annetbell says:

      I think that Varanasi in Hindu history is 9000 years old, and the anthropology indicates 5000. Oh my gosh, either way that is unbelievable. I remember telling Italians that we lived in an old house…..100 years old in New York and then staying in a hotel that had been a hotel continuously used since 1460! It indeed makes us feel small in comparison! Thanks for the lovely, well thought out comment!

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  2. Rusha Sams says:

    Love the pictures! And the realization that this is an ancient religion with many of the same practices hit me, too! I love this country!

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  3. maverickbird says:

    Stunning photos and an amazing insight Anne.As usual just like all your posts,loved it.

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  4. It looks like an amazing trip, with some great photos of the lovely architecture. Fab! 🙂

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  5. foodbod says:

    What stunning images and so interesting, thank you 🙏

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    • annetbell says:

      So glad you enjoyed the post! Namaste. . .

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      • foodbod says:

        Just stunning!

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      • annetbell says:

        I have many more posts already on the blog of temples etc…but I have more to come. It makes me happy when people enjoy!

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      • foodbod says:

        Isn’t that the joy of our blogs? We are sharing what’s in our hearts and it’s wonderful when people like it 💜

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      • annetbell says:

        Yes, that is it exactly. I started writing this blog instead of a boring old journal for my children and grandchildren if they ever want to. A friend said that the blog can be bound into a book and I was going to do that , but I just want to keep on wiring! I am amazed that anyone would be interested but they…you are! Thank you for your encouragement!

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      • foodbod says:

        I first wrote a blog when my best friend died, as letters to her, and it was so therapeutic, and again, people read it and understood and shared my story.
        I’m loving this food blog and the community we all have is wonderful, I was explaining to my (non techy) husband, that I feel like I have pen friends ❤️ I love that we can all be on different continents and sharing what makes out hearts sing.

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  6. Gorgeous photos, I love the temples and all the colour.

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  7. singhcircle says:

    Reblogged this on SinghCircle and commented:
    Great picture. It seems you have travelled more within India than most Indians. Good to see all your photographs and Indian insights.

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    • annetbell says:

      Well, it is my pleasure. I loved every minute but maybe not the minutes of Dehli Belly! 😎 Do you mind telling me where you are from?

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      • singhcircle says:

        Hello. I am from Chandigarh, in Northern India but am now staying in Bahrain.

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      • annetbell says:

        Oh Chandigarh….we went there trying to see the amazing architecture of Louis Kahn. We didn’t have an appointment but did get into the Court Building. I have several posts from March I think on Amritsar….Golden Temple, 1 and 2, In the Garden, and Wagha ( border crossing!) ….Loved the Punjab!
        Namaste. . .

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  8. suzjones says:

    Wow! That is two days in a row now that I have personally experienced another person’s visit to temples. My boss showed me photos of her visits to Thai Buddhist temples yesterday and today I get the opportunity of visiting a Hindi temple with you.
    Amazing 🙂 I am in love with the architecture, history and spirituality of these places.

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    • annetbell says:

      Well bless your heart! I am so glad you enjoyed my post. There are many others in my blog of over 230 posts if you poke around. Temples in the north are quite different architecturally than the ones in the south!

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  9. AngieG9 says:

    I once worked with a girl from India, and was invited to dinner at her apartment on several occasions. She would take her shoes off as soon as she entered her apartment, and I never gave it a thought until I read your post tonight. She apparently broke some rules of etticut (sp. check not working) when she invited me to her home before she had it furnished, because at one time her current boyfriend scolded her for inviting me when we had to sit on the floor to eat. Her meals were wonderful though, and even though she apologized for not making one dish less “hot” for American taste buds, I loved it. I’m not sure how she could have left out any of the spices, because they were so tasty. When at work she wore American style clothes, but at home wore beautiful saris. I wanted one so much, but she was so tiny and I was not at that time.

    It seems so strange that we, in the US consider a building “old” after 20 years, while in Europe and Asia there are building that have been there for centuries. Why don’t we, in this huge country, maintain our buildings the way they do in other countries? The building I live in is 40 years old and they are talking about tearing it down because it’s so “old”, but when I moved in here 11 years ago it was well maintained, and the best place in town to live. It is still considered the safest building in the area, built of reinforced concrete and steel, has survived a direct hit by an F4 tornado that totaled the rest of the area, yet under present management it has been so neglected that most people move in and out by the month. Is it something about our throw away society? Compared to other countries we are still so new, so young, and yet we are so negligent when it comes to maintaining our architecture. What are we really going to leave our children and grandchildren except parking lots?

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    • annetbell says:

      Angie, you are such a good story teller and writer. You have a kind and gentle heart that is quite evident and you are so encouraging, not just to me but I think to everyone you meet and know. Your sickness and other challenges in your life have made you sensitive to others’s challenges.

      I am afraid we in the States are living in a throw away society and don’t really appreciate the old, but are always searching for the new…phone, game, house, car…but there things don’t bring happiness. You have discovered that things don’t bring happiness but sharing and encouraging do to you and the friend to whom you give of yourself. Have a good night sleep and may the sunshine forever shine in your heart!

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  10. Anjali says:

    Anne, your post is as spectacular as temple.. Loved it.. 🙂
    Keep exploring Incredible India and let us explore it through your posts !!!

    Namaste!!!!

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    • annetbell says:

      I am so glad that you approve. At first I was very nervous thinking I was very presumptuous to be writing on incredible India and Indians were going to read it, but the warm gracious Indians have all been so encouraging! Peace!

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  11. wonderfully done, great pics !!!!

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  12. giselzitrone says:

    Wunderschöne Bilder wünsche einen schönen Tag lieber Gruß und Freundschaft.Gislinde

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  13. Swati Singh says:

    Amazing architectural temple! great post.

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  14. Joanne says:

    Thank you for sharing – those stone carvings are simply incredible! 🙂

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  15. Incredible carvings! 🙂

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  16. Rachel T says:

    This is wonderful 🙂 The fact that these beautiful and intricate designs are so well preserved is definitely a testament to the great skill that went into building the temple. How lucky you were to witness first hand such magnificent architecture!

    Like

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